J Wolfgang Goerlich's thoughts on Information Security
Securing The Development Lifecycle

By wolfgang. 6 March 2015 10:31

One line. Ever since the Blaster worm snaked across the Internet, the security community has known that it takes but one line of vulnerable code. Heartbleed and iOS Goto Fail made the point again last year. Both were one line mistakes. Even the Bash Shellshock vulnerability was made possible by a small number of lines of code.

To manage the risk of code-level vulnerabilities, many organizations have implemented security testing in their software development lifecycle. Such testing has touch-points in the implementation, verification, and maintenance phases. For example, an organization might ...

Read the rest at http://content.cbihome.com/blog/securing-development-lifecycle

Tags:

Application Security | Security

Friday Books and Talks 02/27/2015

By wolfgang. 27 February 2015 17:19

TouchPoints
by Douglas Conant, Mette Norgaard

A fresh, effective, and enduring way to lead—starting with your next interaction. Most leaders feel the inevitable interruptions in their jam-packed days are troublesome. But in TouchPoints, Conant and Norgaard argue that these—and every point of contact with other people—are overlooked opportunities for leaders to increase their impact and promote their organization's strategy and values. Through previously untold stories from Conant's tenure as CEO of Campbell Soup Company and Norgaard's vast consulting experience, the authors show that a leader's impact and legacy are built through hundreds, even thousands, of interactive moments in time. The good news is that anyone can develop "TouchPoint" mastery by focusing on three essential components: head, heart, and hands.

TouchPoints speaks to the theory and craft of leadership, promoting a balanced presence of rational, authentic, active, and wise leadership practices. Leadership mastery in the smallest and otherwise ordinary moments can transform aimless activity in individuals and entropy in organizations into focused energy—one magical moment at a time.


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Friday Books and Talks 02/20/2015

By wolfgang. 20 February 2015 07:56

Talent is Never Enough
by John C. Maxwell 

Read the headlines, watch the highlights, or just step out your front door: Some talented people reach their full potential, while others self-destruct or remain trapped in mediocrity. What makes the difference? Maxwell, the go-to guru for business professionals across the globe, insists that the choices people make-not merely the skills they inherit-propel them onto greatness. Among other truths, successful people know that:

  • Belief lifts your talent.
  • Initiative activates your talent.
  • Focus directs your talent.
  • Preparation positions your talent.
  • Practice sharpens your talent.
  • Perseverance sustains your talent.
  • Character protects your talent.

It's what you add to your talent that makes the greatest difference. With authentic examples and time-tested wisdom, Maxwell shares thirteen attributes you need to maximize your potential and live the life of your dreams. You can have talent alone and fall short of your potential. Or you can have talent plus, and really stand out.

 

Low-Hanging Fruit
by Jeremy Eden, Terri Long

How can anyone, from the shop floor up to the C-suite, make their companies better? Despite years of corporate initiatives and implementing big fixes, are there really more simple and smart ways to improve productivity? In Low-Hanging Fruit, co-authors Jeremy Eden and Terri Long not only answer that question, they show how to get it. Low-Hanging Fruit is a fast-paced, fun read with 77 different ways to make a difference at your company. Eden, a former McKinsey consultant and Long, a former bank executive use many great examples from working with teams at Fortune 1000 companies helping them cut through the complexity, the politics and the waste. Low-Hanging Fruit gives you the best ideas culled from their experience such as how to deal with the "unintentional squelch" "zombie projects" and why mom was wrong about always doing your best. 

This isn't a theoretical business tome. This is an indispensable guide that should sit on every career-minded person's desk to be referenced regularly. Often contrarian, always passionate, Low-Hanging Fruit has the power to change your career and your organization. 

Tags:

General

Action-Oriented IT Risk Management

By wolfgang. 19 February 2015 06:15

Last week at Chicago’s Camp IT, I presented on IT risk management and concluded with focusing on the intersection of risk and action. This is a CIO Centric Approach that re-prioritizes risks based on an organization’s constraints and IT capabilities. My Chicago talk led to several good discussions, and this article quickly summarizes the method and how you can apply it to your risk management program.

The advantage, for a security owner, is in immediately seeing which concerns, once mitigated, would produce the largest reduction in the organization’s overall risk. We can then produce the annual audit phonebook with a long laundry list of recommendations.

The disadvantage, for the IT owner, is in not factoring in effort. For example, suppose one risk rated 15 takes 12 months to resolve and another takes 3 months. Yet both are listed side-by-side and prioritized equally by the security owner. The trouble stems from the risk rating exercise not bubbling up quick wins and prioritized actions.

Read the rest at http://content.cbihome.com/blog/cbi-action-oriented-it-risk-management

Tags:

Risk Management

Configuring trusted keys and certificates (PCI-DSS)

By wolfgang. 16 February 2015 20:00

PCI-DSS 3 requires that in-scope devices, like cash register computers or payment processing servers, accept only trusted certificates. Specifically, it states:

Protect Cardholder Data
Requirement 4: Encrypt transmission of cardholder data across open, public networks
4.1(b) Are only trusted keys and/or certificates accepted?

Sensitive information must be encrypted during transmission over public networks, because it is easy and common for a malicious individual to intercept and/or divert data while in transit. Secure transmission of cardholder data requires using trusted keys/certificates, a secure protocol for transport, and proper encryption strength to encrypt cardholder data. Connection requests from systems that do not support the required encryption strength, and that would result in an insecure connection, should not be accepted. Verifying that certificates are trusted (for example, have not expired and are issued from a trusted source) helps ensure the integrity of the secure connection.

So, how do you do this in Windows?

First, view the certificates of all payment processing services and document the trusted root certificate. Add to this list of trusted root certificates those that are required for Microsoft Windows to function. (This list is documented here: http://support2.microsoft.com/?id=293781). Create one master list of all certificates that should be accepted. 

Second, open the local computer’s certificate store. (Control Panel > All Tasks > Administrative Tools > Manage computer certificates.) Under Trusted Root Certification Authorities, expand Certificates. Delete all certificate authorities not on the previously created master list. 

Third, configure the computer’s Web browser to not allow the user to continue to Websites with untrusted certificates. This setting varies from browser to browser. In Internet Explorer, the settings are in Local Security Policy under:

Windows Components\Internet Explorer\Internet Control Panel
Prevent ignoring certificate errors

Windows Components\Internet Explorer\Internet Control Panel\Advanced Page
Turn on warn about certificate address mismatch
Check for server certificate revocation

The computer will now accept only those certificates accepted for business purposes. Any invalid certificates will stop the transaction and not allow the user to inadvertently continue. This configuration reduces the likelihood of Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks, signed malware, and other attacks against certificate infrastructure. In addition, the computer’s configuration is now in compliance with PCI-DSS 3’s 4.1.b requirement.

Some additional thoughts:

 

Tags:

Cryptography

Premiership CISOs – How Are You Treating Yours?

By wolfgang. 5 February 2015 06:13

Sarah Clarke (@S_Clarke22) kicked off a good conversation on twitter about our expectations and treatment of CISOs. She summarized the discussion here:

Premiership CISOs – How Are You Treating Yours?
http://infospectives.co.uk/2015/02/04/premiership-cisos-how-are-you-treating-yours/

 

Tags:

Leadership

Biggest Mistakes Companies Make with Data & Information Security

By wolfgang. 4 February 2015 09:26

The fundamental mistake companies make with data security is...

Neglecting data governance.

Many companies lack the processes, policies, and standards for protecting data throughout its lifecycle. How is new data added and classified? How are people given access, and how often is that access reviewed? Are the backups and redundancies sufficient given the type of data? How is data access monitored and reported on? Is sufficient data loss prevention in place to protect the company? And, once the data reaches its end-of-life, how is the data gracefully retired? The companies which fail to think through the long term implications of data leave themselves open to security incidents and breaches.

Read the rest of the insights here:

Data Security Experts Reveal the Biggest Mistakes Companies Make with Data & Information Security
https://digitalguardian.com/blog/data-security-experts-reveal-biggest-mistakes-companies-make-data-information-security

Tags:

Intellectual property | Data Loss Prevention

Guest on PVC Security

By wolfgang. 3 February 2015 17:17

PVC is short for Passion, Vision, Communication (& Execution) and is a leadership podcast hosted by Ed Rojas (@EdgarR0jas) and Paul Jorgensen (@prjorgensen). I am a fan of both of their leadership styles, and was pleased that they joined us at BSides Detroit 14. (The talk Ed gave, for example, landed one guy a job and helped another guy launch his own city sec group.) Ed and Paul had me on the podcast to discuss leadership, grandparenting, my strange love of Excel, and the adhocracy that is MiSec.

They also got me singing the intro. So, there's that. Listen to the episode on iTunes or catch it here:

http://www.pvcsec.com/2015/02/03/pvcsec-episode-13-the-ways-of-the-wolf/

Tags:

Leadership

Friday Books and Talks 01/30/2015

By wolfgang. 30 January 2015 16:59

How Did That Happen?
by Roger Connors, Tom Smith

The economy crashes, the government misfires, businesses fail, leaders don't lead, managers don't manage, and the people we count on for the results that affect our own performance don't follow through, leaving us asking, "How did that happen?" Surprises caused by a lack of personal accountability plague almost every organization today, from the political arena to every large and small business. How Did That Happen? offers a proven way to eliminate these nasty surprises, gain an unbeatable competitive edge, and enhance performance by holding others accountable in a positive, principled way.

The Definitive Drucker
by Elizabeth Haas Edersheim

For sixteen months before his death, Elizabeth Haas Edersheim was given unprecedented access to Peter Drucker, widely regarded as the father of modern management. At Drucker's request, Edersheim, a respected management thinker in her own right, spoke with him about the development of modern business throughout his life-and how it continues to grow and change at an ever-increasing rate. The Definitive Drucker captures his visionary management concepts, applies them to the key business risks and opportunities of the coming decades, and imparts Drucker's views on current business practices, economic changes, and trends-many of which he first predicted decades ago. It also sheds light onto issues such as why so many leaders fail, the fragility of our economic systems, and the new role of the CEO.


Tags:

General

Friday Books and Talks 01/23/2015

By wolfgang. 23 January 2015 16:15

Drucker on Leadership
by William A. Cohen, Ph.D.

Although Peter Drucker, "The Father of Modern Management," died in 2005, his timeless teachings are studied and practiced by forward-thinking managers worldwide. His lessons and wisdom on the topic of leadership-the central element of management-are in constant demand, yet he wrote little under that actual subject heading. In Drucker on Leadership , William A. Cohen explores Drucker's lost leadership lessons-why they are missing, what they are, why they are important, and how to apply them. As Cohen explains, Drucker was ambivalent about leadership for much of his career, making it clear that leadership was not by itself "good or desirable." While Drucker struggled with the concept of leadership, he was well aware that it had a critical impact on the accomplishment of all projects and human endeavors. There is no book from Drucker specifically dedicated to leadership, but a wealth of information about leadership can be found scattered throughout his 40 books and hundreds of articles. Drucker's teachings about leadership have saved many corporations from failure and helped guide others to outstanding success. Many of the leadership concepts revealed in this book will surprise and perhaps shock Drucker's followers. For example, who would have thought that Peter Drucker taught that "leadership is a marketing job" or that "the best leadership lessons for business or any nonprofit organization come from the military"? Written for anyone who values the insights of the man whose name is synonymous with excellence in management, Drucker on Leadership offers a deeper understanding of what makes an extraordinary leader.

 

Just Listen
by Mark Goulston

The first make-or-break step in persuading anyone to do any thing is getting them to hear you out. Whether the person is a harried colleague, a stressed-out client, or an insecure spouse, things will go from bad to worse if you can't break through emotional barricades. Drawing on his experience as a psychiatrist, business consultant, and coach, and backed by the latest scientific research, author Mark Goulston shares simple but power ful techniques readers can use to really get through to people--whether they're coworkers, friends, strangers, or enemies. Getting through is a fine art but a critical one. With the help of this groundbreaking book readers will be able to turn the "impossible" and "unreachable" people in their lives into allies, devoted customers, loyal colleagues, and lifetime friends.

Sitting people down and lecturing them rarely works, because it makes them defensive and when they’re defensive, they hide things from you. Work side by side with them in a cooperative activity, however, and you’ll lower their guard and get them to open up.

Tags:

General

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